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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

W-2 Employees

Workers who are paid hourly on a regular basis and work with a staffing firm that handles their payroll.

White Labelling

A method by which the staffing firm or managed service provider markets the position under the client’s brand rather than its own.

Wind Down Fees

Fees that apply to the transition out of a service as the service is then taken in-house or transitioned to another supplier. Fairly common in outsourcing arrangements.

Witkey or 威客

The term used in China to describe a Web-based system whereby users can purchase or exchange services and information or simply share useful knowledge and experience. These platforms, with colorful names and lively, somewhat informal website home pages, act as bustling electronic marketplaces in which people and businesses can sell and buy services (typically labor services provided by a person to a business or to another person). Services can range from business professional services (like software development, accounting, marketing) to more personal services (like cleaning, home care, etc.). Many of the services can be performed and paid for online, but there is no doubt that many of the services are delivered locally, on premise. Witkeys seem similar enough to Online Staffing platforms in other parts of the world to include them in the general SIA Online Staffing segment category. However, the population of Online Staffing platforms outside of China tend to be clearly divided — at least to date — into those that support business services and professional skills categories (Elance-oDesk, freelancer.com, etc.) and those that cater to consumer services and lower-skilled workers (Task Rabbit, Thumbtack, etc.). The Chinese version of Online Staffing platform, Witkeys, seem to cater to both of these segments.

Women and Minority Business Enterprise (WMBE)

Suppliers that meet government criteria to qualify them as being women- or minority-owned. (See also: Diversity Supplier.)

Work Order

Refers to a request from an organization for a specific type of service to be provided by one or more temporary employees for a specific period of time.

Work Sharing

The situation in which two or more workers may “share” one full-time position at a company, often for the purpose of schedule flexibility. The workers often stagger their schedule in order to meet outside personal commitments such as family responsibilities. In other cases, an employer, in lieu of a layoff, may combine two jobs into one and retain both workers, each working a reduced schedule.

Worker Dispatch Law

The law that governs the supply of temporary workers in Japan. Amended in 2015, it lifted restrictions for some industry sectors but imposed a 3-year maximum limit on the assignment of individual workers to the same client.

Worker Tracking

Workers’ Compensation

Financial compensation to an employee for work-related injuries, in particular compensation of loss of wages, sometimes also for medical costs. Typically one of the major costs that staffing firms are responsible for, and in occupations such as industrial staffing, the cost of workers’ compensation insurance is significant in determining profitability.

Workforce Mix Optimization

The practice of using the right percentage of each workforce category (employees or contingent workers) to accomplish corporate objectives as profitably and safely as possible.

Workforce Planning

Workforce Solutions

Workforce Solutions are third-party products and services relating to the sourcing, engagement and development of employed and non-employed (including contingent) workers. Workforce Solutions includes the Staffing Industry and five other important segments; Talent Acquisition Technology, Process Outsourcing, Payrolling/Compliance, Contracting/Consulting, and Other Workforce Solutions.

Workforce Solutions Ecosystem

The Workforce Solutions Ecosystem highlights interconnected components of the Staffing Industry and other types of Workforce Solutions. It comprises six primary segments all of which are further defined in this Lexicon: • Staffing, • Process Outsourcing, • Payrolling/Compliance, • Contracting/Consulting, • Talent Acquisition Technology, and • Other Workforce Solutions Businesses in this Ecosystem operate in a broad and complex network of related and unrelated products and services which interact and compete with each other. We have placed the Staffing Industry at the core of this Ecosystem, though, of course, we realize that this will appear to be a somewhat biased perspective if the center of your particular universe lies elsewhere. We are confident that the Workforce Solutions Ecosystem provides a good representation of the market as it exists today, but we are equally confident that it will need reviewing and updating on a fairly frequent basis, owing to the rapid evolution of technology and globalization.

Working Time Regulations (WTR)

United Kingdom legislation that regulates the time employees can be required to work and the rests and breaks to which they are entitled. It also applies to Agency Workers.

Works Council

An organization representing workers that functions as a local/firm-level complement to national labor negotiations. Works councils exist with different names in a variety of related forms in a number of European countries. Works councils can also be formed in non-unionized companies. Works council representatives may also be appointed to the Board of Directors. The aim of works councils is to reduce workplace conflict by improving and systematizing communication channels; to increase bargaining power of workers by means of legislation; and to correct market failures by means of public policy. In 1994, the European Union passed a Directive (94/45/EC) on the establishment of a European Works Council (EWC) or similar procedure for the purposes of informing and consulting employees in companies which operate at European Union level. The EWC Directive applies to companies with at least 1,000 employees within the European Union and at least 150 employees in each of at least two Member States. The Agency Workers Directive includes the requirement that Agency Workers should be included in employee headcount for this purpose. In some markets, temporary workers may actually be represented on Works Councils (sometimes after a qualifying period).
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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