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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Day Labor

The provision of temporary workers to clients on a daily-pay, daily-availability basis, often on a multiple-worker basis. Day labor offices typically provide unskilled labor such as construction and may include transportation to and from the job site.

Days Sales Outstanding (DSO)

Days Sales Outstanding is a company’s average collection period. A low number of days indicate that the company collects its outstanding receivables quickly. The DSO figure is an index of the relationship between outstanding receivables and sales achieved over a given period. This is a critical consideration for staffing firms that are required (by law in some countries) to pay employees on a frequent basis (normally weekly) while receiving payment from clients could take significant amounts of time. In Europe, DSO is more commonly referred to as Debtor Days.

Deregulering Beoordeling Arbeidsrelaties (DBA) Law

As of May 1, 2017, the VAR in the Netherlands is replaced by the DBA system of clients and contractors entering into model agreements to reflect the working relationship they have with each other. Not all freelancers need a model agreement. When it is obvious that they are self-employed, they can work without a model agreement. Under the DBA, both parties are responsible for compliance with laws and regulations in the event that the relationship is misclassified as self-employment. (See VAR Declaration)

Direct Employment

A two-way direct employment relationship between a worker and an employer, with no third-party broker or co-employer involved.

Direct Hire

A term commonly used to refer to services provided by a staffing agency related to helping an organization obtain an employee to work on their payroll as opposed to temporary staffing relationship where the employee is typically working on the staffing firm’s payroll. In a direct hire arrangement, the provider is only paid a fee if a placement is made, as opposed to a retained search arrangement. (See also: Temporary-to-Permanent Conversion.)

Direct Sourcing

A term commonly used to refer to the process by which a company leverages its own candidate pool (e.g., former employees, retirees, silver medalist applicants from its own ATS) to place within the company, as contingent/temporary employees. Direct sourcing does not necessarily mean that 100% of a company’s hiring will be done in-house and with no relationships with intermediaries. In earlier times, this practice for contingent workers largely consisted of informally sourced, pre-identified candidates who were placed on the payroll of a third-party payroll provider. More modern and mature direct sourcing programs typically leverage the employer brand in job advertising to maximize candidate flow. More recently, the demand for direct sourcing has been accelerated by the evolution and multiplication of talent acquisition tools and services (aided by developments in artificial intelligence and big data). Such tools include software for managing and curating candidate talent pools. Next-generation direct sourcing programs often include a talent curation service layer (either internal or outsourced) and a partner to take on employment responsibility (employer of record/agent of record services in the US) for those workers who should not be or do not want to be classified as independent.

Directly Sourced Contingent Workers

A service segment of the Contracting/Consulting Industry, Directly Sourced Contingent Workers include independent contractors/consultants, temporary workers sourced from an internally developed pool of talent and others such as summer interns, seasonal workers, retirees and other contingent workers not sourced from a third-party staffing supplier. In a Direct Sourcing Model, company most often finds talent and administers the talent pool, but may engage a third party to do so as well.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

Formerly known as the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB), the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is an executive agency of the UK Home Office set up to help organizations make safer recruitment decisions. The DBS acts as a “one-stop-shop” for organizations, checking police records and, in relevant cases, information held by the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). In the United Kingdom, staffing companies are legally obliged to undertake DBS checks for candidates put forward for any temporary assignments that include working with children or vulnerable adults. Note: In contrast, within some markets, such as the Netherlands, criminal record (and health checks) are forbidden by law.

Dispatch Worker

The translated English term commonly used in Japan and some other South East Asian markets for temporary agency worker.

Diversity Supplier

In North America, this refers to a minority-, woman-, disabled- or veteran-owned staffing supplier. Organizations often find that using diversity suppliers as part of their staffing supplier base is a good way to meet their diversity recruitment goals. (See also: Women and Minority Business Enterprise.) In Europe, a Diversity Supplier could be taken to mean a supplier with an equal opportunities policy in place, which ensures equal treatment for workers from disadvantaged minority groups.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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